Skip to main content

Jesus or Paul? (Part 3: The Breaking of Shalom)


Jesus or Paul?
Making People’s Lives Right or Making People’s Beliefs Right?
Part 3


The Breaking of Shalom

Making the “right to live” a reality requires “loyalty to the community” by God and people. Leaders and members of the community are responsible for creating and maintaining that environment. We see this in the second definition above. The entire community is charged with the responsibility of “the elimination of anything breaking the shalom.” This is the cornerstone of human justice.

The primary mission of every follower of Jesus is
the elimination of anything breaking the shalom!

In the teachings of Jesus, tzedaqah is linked to shalom. Isaiah 32:17 helps us see that link through the eyes of members of the Jewish culture:

The deed of tzedaqah shall be shalom
and the labor of tzedaqah shall be tranquility and safety forever.

Shalom results from the deed of tzedaqah.” Now we must clearly understand what “shalom” meant to Jesus. In Hebrew: The Eternal Language by William Chomsky (p. 4) we learn that the word shalom, usually rendered by “peace,” has in effect little in common with its English equivalent. Shalom does not have the passive, even negative, connotation of the word “peace.” Shalom does not mean merely the absence of strife.

Shalom is pregnant with positive, active and energetic meaning and association. It connotes totality, health, wholesomeness, harmony, success, the completeness and richness of living in an integrated social milieu. When people meet or part they wish each other shalom, or they inquire about each other’s shalom.

The “breaking of shalom” describes “the breaking down of totality, health, wholesomeness, harmony, success, the completeness and richness of living in an integrated social milieu in the community.” How people respond to the “breaking of shalom” is the unspoken theme of one of the most famous and important messages Jesus delivered. It was about a subject that was very much on the minds of his audience members -- the imminent coming of the end of days and the Great Day of Judgment (Matthew 25:31-46).

The scene opens with all nations standing in judgment before God’s designated judge, the Son of Man, King of the Kingdom of God. The nations are divided into two groups – the righteous on his right and the cursed on his left.

When the “breaking of shalom” occurred in their nations, the righteous did acts of tzedaqah to restore shalom in lives.

When the “breaking of shalom” occurred in their nations, the cursed did not do acts of tzedaqah to restore shalom in lives.

Now let’s see the examples Jesus used to describe “the breaking of shalom.

Hunger reveals the “breaking of shalom in the community.” The act of tzedaqah to restore shalom was for a community member breaking bread with the hungry person – taking the hungry to his or her home, eating with the guest, blessed God together for providing the food, and visit together.

Thirst reveals the “breaking of shalom in the community.” The act of tzedaqah to restore shalom was for a community member to give the thirsty person something to drink and visit together. 

The lack of clothing reveals the “breaking of shalom in the community.” The act of tzedaqah to restore shalom was for a community member to give the person clothes and visit together.

Homelessness reveals the “breaking of shalom in the community.” The act of tzedaqah to restore shalom was for a community member to take the homeless person into his or her home and visit together.

Sickness reveals the “breaking of shalom in the community.” The act of tzedaqah to restore shalom was for a community member to visit with them.

Imprisonment reveals the “breaking of shalom in the community.” The act of tzedaqah to restore shalom was for a community member to visit with those in prison.

When most readers of English translations of Matthew 25:31-26 read the words of their Bible that see a hungry person being fed, a thirsty person being given a drink, a naked person being given clothes, a homeless person being given shelter, a sick person being visited and a person in prison being visited.

When the Jewish audience heard Jesus’s description of what people did in each situation above, they knew he was talking about times when “the shalom of the community was broken” -- and  community members “restored the shalom” by doing acts of tzedaqah. God saw “people created in His image” revealing His image upon the Earth” by restoring lives to the conditions He had created them to experience.  
______________________________________________

Did you find this information valuable?
Please let us know by “Liking” “BHC’s Real Yeshua Facebook Page”.
Help us provide future blogs and articles by donating too -- Click Here
Please share this with others too!
______________________________________________


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Do Not Say RAQA! - Yeshua on Anger (Part 2)

In the last blog, we covered the first part of Yeshua’s lesson on Anger -- An Angry Person Should be Tried in Court like a Murderer – keep in mind that “anger” is the focus of Yeshua’s lesson.
“Whoever says to a brother, ‘RAKA,’ shall be answerable to the Sanhedrin.” [i]
Yeshua reveals that the seriousness of the offense has become greater by elevating the crime to the next highest court – the Sanhedrin. It is the highest court in the nation and would be the equivalent of our Supreme Court. What makes this offense more serious than murder, to keep things in the context established by Yeshua? It is because of what the angry person said out of anger – “RAKA!”
RAKA is the English transliteration of the Greek word found in the ancient manuscripts of Matthew. Interestingly, the Greek word is also a transliteration of a Hebrew word into Greek. Keep in mind that when a translator working on a translation of a Greek manuscript transliterates a Greek word, he only finds the closest equivalent En…

The Prayer Yeshua Prayed Twice Every Day

One of Jesus’s earliest memories was no doubt watching and listening to his family when they gathered to pray the Shema at sunrise before the day’s work began and after the working work day was over at sunset. He also heard and participated in praying the Shema at their synagogue. He was surrounded by neighbors who also prayed the same prayer in their homes every day.
The Hebrew word for prayer is tefilah. It is derived from the root Pe-Lamed-Lamed and the word l'hitpalel, meaning “to judge oneself.” This surprising word origin provides insight into the purpose of Jewish prayer. The most important part of any Jewish prayer, whether it be a prayer of petition, of thanksgiving, of praise of God, or of confession, is the introspection it provides, the moment that we spend looking inside ourselves, seeing our role in the universe and our relationship to God.[1]
Most of Jewish prayers are expressed in the first person plural, "us" instead of "me," and are recited on b…

What is a “tittle”?

For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one yod or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. (Matthew 5:18)
In the last blog we learned that a “jot” was really “yod,” the smallest letter of the Hebrew alphabet. So, now let’s turn our attention to “tittle” and see what it means. It is another one of those words you never hear or use in everyday conversations.
First, let’s see look up tittle in an English dictionary and see if we can find a definition. There is a definition and it is: “a dot or other small mark in writing or printing, used as a diacritic, punctuation, etc.”
However, when we look at a yod we do not find any dots or small marks. Follow the arrow and look at the very upper left tip of the yod.  י Do you see the small point? When we turn to the Jewish culture of Yeshua we find that the scribes had a name for it -- קוץ (QOTz). The translation of the word קוץ is “thorn.”[i] When Yeshua spoke he said, “Till heaven and earth pass, one yo…